Our Vision

Working together to provide economic opportunities.

 
 

The 2016 presidential election was a cry for help from millions of Americans on both sides of the country’s deepening partisan divide. White voters who lack college degrees flocked to Donald Trump and his pledge to “Make America Great Again,” while many Black and Hispanic voters who turned out for Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012 stayed home last fall rather than support his Democratic heir apparent, Hillary Clinton.

The two groups – Trump voters and dissatisfied Democrats – obviously don’t align on many specific policy fights, but they share a general frustration that Washington is not working on issues that impact them directly. And many of these voters are more motivated by pocketbook concerns than the partisan priorities being debated in Congress – Planned Parenthood and climate change, to name a few.

One of the reasons for this shared frustration is that the overwhelming majority of Blacks, Hispanics and Whites who did not finish college tend to make less money than Whites who have a four-year degree. This split feeds the growing resentment that many Americans harbor against Wall Street, Hollywood, and Washington. It’s a driving force behind the economic nationalism in both parties.

In 2016, the Brookings Institute studied Census data to analyze the poverty rate in each congressional district from 2010-2014. They pinpointed the exact percentage of people in all 435 House districts who live below the poverty line. We matched the 100 poorest districts with the lawmakers who represent them. In total, 73 of those districts are represented by a member of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC), the Congressional Hispanic Caucus (CHC) or a conservative Republican.

 

Sam Geduldig
Title, CGCN Group

 
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